Listening: Übung 2 von Mike Giesler

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Über den Vortrag

Der Vortrag „Listening: Übung 2“ von Mike Giesler ist Bestandteil des Kurses „Vorbereitungskurs TOEFL iBT“. Der Vortrag ist dabei in folgende Kapitel unterteilt:

  • Well Made Play
  • Arbeit mit einem Vortrag
  • Bearbeitung der Aufgaben

Dozent des Vortrages Listening: Übung 2

 Mike Giesler

Mike Giesler

Mike Giesler ist Dozent für SAT und TOEFL Kurse und kennt sich als solcher bestens aus mit den TOEFL Anforderungen. Er ist Experte für die englische Sprache und bietet Expertise in den Bereichen Auslandsstudium, Studienplatzvergabe und Stipendium.

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... of creating believable characters in plays. b) The influence of the literature of ...

... using logic to guess the ending. c) To avoid writing ending similar to those of other plays. d) To ensure ...

... examples of typical characters in a well-made play. b) To show how background information might be revealed in a ...

... success. b) The introduction of new characters midway through the play.c.) Information known to the audience but not to the main ...

... the denouement. a) The difference between them might be unclear to some people. b) Both are useful ...

... the plot of the play. Why does the professor say this: "Professor, it ..."

... the students understand the meaning of a new term. b) To indicate that his point is not related ...

... English pronunciation, ask them to read the transcripts aloud to you. Listening to the transcripts is better practice than reading them to yourself. If someone reads the transcripts to you, make sure you see the pictures. You may take notes while you listen, and you may use your notes to help you answer the questions. ...

... have an interlibrary loan service … if you need to get hold of a book that’s not in our library. There’s a truck that runs between our library and a few other public and university libraries in this area. It comes around three times a week. Student: Hey, that’s great! At my last school, it could take a really long time to get the materials I needed, so when I had a project, I had to make a plan way in advance. This sounds much faster. Another thing I was wondering is … is there a place where I can bring my computer and hook it up? Librarian ...

... How much do you guys charge? Librarian: Seven cents a copy. Student: That’s not too bad. Thanks. Uh, where’s the collection of rare books? Librarian: Rare books are up on the second floor. They’re in a separate room where the temperature is controlled to preserve the old paper in them. You need to get special permission to access them, and then you’ll have to wear gloves to handle them, ’cause the oils in our hands, you know, can destroy the paper, and gloves prevent that, so we have a basket of gloves in the room. ...

... the resources, all the books and information I need right here in one place! Librarian: Yup, that’s the idea! Which sentence best expresses what the librarian means when she says this: Librarian: Yup, that’s the idea! ...

... we call “realism” develop in the European theater. Uh, to understand this, though, we first need to look at an earlier form of drama known as the “well-made play,” which, basically, was a pattern for constructing plays — plays that, um, beginning with some early nineteenth-century comedies in France, proved very successful commercially. The dramatic devices used here weren’t actually anything new — they’d been around for centuries. But the formula for a well-made play required that certain of these elements be included, in a particular order, and — most importantly — that everything ...

... letter or through someone else’s conversation who this mysterious gentleman is and why he left the town many years before. But the young man doesn’t know about this … and the woman doesn’t understand the ancient connection between her family and his. And before the secrets are revealed to the main characters, the plot of the play proceeds as a series of sort of up-and-down moments. For example, the woman first appears not to even notice the young man, and it seems to him like the end of the world. But then he learns that she actually wants to meet him too, so life is wonderful. Then if ...

... in every play, which is why it’s called the obligatory scene. And that’s followed by the final dramatic element … the denouement or the resolution, when all the loose ends have to be tied up in a logical way. Remember, the obligatory scene gives the audience emotional pleasure, but the denouement offers the audience a logical conclusion. That’s the subtle distinction we need to try very hard to keep in mind. So, as I said, the well-made play — this form of playwriting — became the basis ...

... does the professor imply about the obligatory scene and the denouement? (A) The difference between them might be unclear to some people. (B) Both are useful techniques for developing realistic characters. (C) The denouement usually occurs within the obligatory scene. (D) The obligatory scene is usually less exciting than the denouement. 25. Part of the lecture is repeated below. Read it and answer the question: Professor: This is the inciting incident. It sets off the plot of the play. Why does the professor say this: ...

... So … are there any questions? Female student: Yes, um, Professor Harrison? You were saying that the periodic table is predictive? What exactly does that mean? I mean, I understand how it organizes the elements, but … where’s the prediction? Professor: OK, let’s look at our periodic table again. OK — it groups elements into categories that share certain properties, right? Female student: Uh-huh … Professor: And it’s arranged ...

... protons. And they named it masurium. Male student: Um, Professor Harrison? Then how come in my periodic table here element 43 is “Tc”— that’s technetium, right? Professor: OK, let me add that … actually, uh, that’s the point I’m coming to. Hardly anyone believed that Tacke had discovered a new element. X-ray spectroscopy was a new method at the time. And they were never able to isolate enough masurium to have a weighable sample, to convince everyone of ...

... if it ever had been present on Earth it would have decayed ages ago … So … the masurium people were obviously wrong and the technetium people were right … right? Well, that was then. Now we know that element 43 does occur naturally — it can be naturally generated from uranium atoms that have spontaneously split. And guess what … the ore sample the masurium group was working with had plenty of uranium in it — enough to split into measurable amounts of masurium. So Tacke’s team might very well have found small amounts of masurium in their ore sample. It’s just that once it was generated from split uranium, it decayed very quickly. And you know, here’s an incredible irony. Ida Tacke — the chemist who led the masurium team — well, she was the first to suggest that uranium could break up ...

... to know if the team actually discovered element 43. (C) The team’s unusual scientific methods were unreliable. (D) If the team’s ore sample had contained element 43, the team would have been able to isolate a weighable amount. 31. Part of the lecture is repeated below. Read it and answer the question. Professor: And you know, here’s an incredible irony: Ida Tacke, the chemist who led the masurium team … well, she was the first to suggest that uranium could break up into smaller pieces. But she didn’t know that that was the defense of her own discovery of element 43! What does the professor imply about the chemist Ida Tacke when he says this: Professor: But she ...

... Ask them to read the transcripts aloud to you. Listening to the transcripts is better practice than reading them to yourself. If someone reads the transcripts to you make sure you see the pictures. You may take notes while you listen and you may use your notes to help you answer the questions. ...

... Well I was talking about an issue in strategic marketing. The health-club model … I mean with a health club you might think they would have trouble attracting customers right? Student: Well I know when I pass by a health club and I see all those people working out … exercising … I’d just as soon walk on by! Professor: Yeah there’s that plus … lots of people have exercise equipment at home or they can play sports with their friends right? Student: Sure Professor, but ...

... about people having more fun relating better to others and improving their own lives if they become members. Student: Sure. That makes sense. Professor: Well then, can you think of another business or organization that could benefit from doing this? Student: Um … Professor: Think about an important building on campus here something everyone uses … a major source of … information. Student: You mean like an administrative building? Professor: Well that’s not what I had in mind … Student: Oh! You mean the library? ...

... as many services as health clubs. (C) They should not spend money on high-quality equipment. (d) They need to give greater emphasis to strategic marketing. 33. Part of the lecture is repeated below. ... . Professor: I mean with a health club you might think they would have trouble attracting customers right? Student: Well I know when I pass by a health club and I see all those people working out … exercising … I’d just as soon walk on by! Why does the student say this ...

... were amazed at how huge some of these glaciers are. Now even though it may be difficult to understand how a huge mass of ice can move—or flow it’s another word for it - it’s really no secret that glaciers flow because of gravity. But how they flow the way they flow needs some explaining. Now, the first type of glacier flow is called basal slip. Basal slip - or sliding as it’s often called - basically refers to the slipping or sliding of a glacier across bedrock - actually ...

... glacier in a cooler region. Now I’d like to touch briefly on extension and compression. Your textbook includes these as types - as a particular type - of glacial movement but you’ll see that there are as many textbooks that omit it as a type of movement as include it. And I might not include it right now if it weren’t in your textbook. But basically the upper parts of glaciers have less pressure on them so they don’t deform as easily, they tend to be more brittle. And crevasses can form in these upper layers of the glaciers when the glacier comes into contact with bedrock walls or is otherwise under some kind of stress but can’t deform quickly enough. So the ice will expand or constrict and that can cause big fissures, big cracks ...

... 1. 2. 3. 4. Answer Choices (A) Friction between the glacier and bedrock is reduced. (B) A liquid layer forms at the base of the glacier. (C) The glacier begins to slide. (d) Pressure is increased on the ice. 36. What factors are involved that the amount of deformation a glacier undergoes? Choose 2 answers. (A) Thickness of glacial ice (B) The hardness of glacial ice (C) The amount of water beneath the glacial ice (d) The temperature ...

... include it right now if it weren’t in your textbook. ... . (A) He believes it accounts for a great deal of glacial movement. (B) He thinks it is a slower type of glacial ...

... who went to Paris at that time to become artists. Now, from your reading what do you know about Paris … about the art world of Paris during the late nineteenth century? Male student: People came there from all over the world to study. Female student: It had a lot of art schools and artists who taught painting. There were … our book mentions classes for women artists. And it was a good place to go to study art. ...

... How would you like it if I did that in this class? Male student: No way! Female student: But our textbook said that the competitive … the competition was good for women. It helped them see where they needed to improve. Professor: Isn’t that interesting? One woman artist, her name was Marie Bashkirtseff. Professor: Bashkirtseff once wrote how she felt about a classmate’s work. She thought her classmate’s art was much better than her own and it gave her an incentive to do better. Overall the competition in the women’s art classes gave women more confidence. Confidence that they could also compete in the art ...

... had a painting in the Salon in 1881. Interestingly this masterpiece called In the Studio is a painting of the interior of Julian’s art school. It’s not in your textbook - I’ll show you the painting next week … The painting depicts an active crowded studio with women drawing and painting a live model. It was actually Bashkirtseff actually followed Julian’s savvy suggestion and painted her fellow students in a class at the school with the artist herself at the far right - a great advertisement for the school when the painting eventually hung at the Salon for a women’s studio had never been painted before. Directions: Now answer the questions. 40. What is the lecture mainly about? (A) Why the Salon exhibitions became popular among women artists ...

... place to go to study art. Professor If you wanted to become an artist Paris was not a good place to go - Paris was the place to go. What does the professor mean, when he says this? Professor: If you wanted to become an artist Paris was not a good place to go - Paris was the place to go. (A) Paris was a popular place to visit but not ...

... on the Quick Prep Web site at http://www.ets.org/toefl/quickprep. Listen to each recording only one time. Written transcripts of the audio portions are located in Appendix l. If you do not have access to the audio portions, but do have access to people with good English pronunciation, ask them to read the transcripts aloud to you. Listening to the transcripts is better practice than reading them to yourself. If someone reads the transcripts ...

... mention his classmates? (A) To explain how he obtained information about field research (l) To point out that many students like to do field research (C) To show that it is difficult to get intermediate-level credits (D) To emphasize his motivation to do field research in two of his courses 18. Why does the registrar tell the man to contact his chairperson immediately? (A) A deadline has already passed. (l) The man has a limited time to resolve his problem. (C) The man first needs to find out if the ...

... a bat? 2 answers. [A] The moth might stop beating its wings. [l] The moth might emit high-frequency sounds. [C] The moth might leave the area. [D] The moth might change its color to match its surroundings. 23. What surprising information did a recent experiment reveal about lesser spear-nosed bats? (A) They filter out echoes from some types of trees. (l) They can analyze echoes from stationary objects with complex surfaces. (C) They cannot analyze “jagged” echoes. (D) They cannot analyze echoes from ...

... Listen to Track 4. (A) To answer a question that Carol asked (l) To correct ...

... was easier to find than quartz. (l) Clear glass was easier to cut to the appropriate size. (C) Clear glass magnified the letters more than quartz did. (D) Clear glass was less expensive than quartz. 28. What does the professor imply about the invention of eyeglasses? (A) Its historical records are more detailed than those of other ...

... were a symbol of wealth and wisdom. (C) They could not correct vision accurately. (D) They could be bought only from traveling peddlers. 30. Put the events in the order that they happened. 1. 2. 3. 4. answer Choices ...

... Listen to each recording only one time. Written transcripts of the audio portions are located in Appendix l. If you do not have access to the audio portions, but do have access to people with good English pronunciation, ask them to read the transcripts aloud to you. Listening to the transcripts is better practice than reading them to yourself. If someone reads the transcripts ...

... that he spend his time on another project. [C] The party does not require much preparation. [D] Dean Adams is not permanently leaving the department. 32. Why does the professor talk about speciation? (A) To describe the main focus of the work she needs help with (l) To tell the man about a new research area in ethnology (C) To explain what Dean Adams chose to work on in Indonesia (D) To demonstrate how varied Dean Adams’ research has been ...

... groups of Native Americans. 37. Why does the professor mention French traders who arrived in the Iroquois region? (A) To illustrate how far news of the Iroquois canoe design had traveled (l) To explain the kinds of objects the Iroquois received in exchange for their canoes (C) To support her point about how efficient the Iroquois canoe design was (D) To emphasize that the Iroquois were the first settlers in that region 38. Listen to Track 4. (A) To share what he knows about birch wood (l) To point out ...

... the population density of blackcaps in two different habitats? (A) To explain the similar reproductive rates in the two habitats (l) To explain the relation between a species’ population density and its nesting behavior (C) To illustrate the advantages of a preferred habitat over a secondary habitat (D) To illustrate the possible impact of making a poor habitat selection 44. according to the professor, why did some blackcaps choose a secondary habitat? (A) They were following a moving food supply. (l) Their preferred habitat was taken over by another bird species. (C) Their nesting ...