Business negotiation (part 1): strategies von Michael Schmitz

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Über den Vortrag

Der Vortrag „Business negotiation (part 1): strategies“ von Michael Schmitz ist Bestandteil des Kurses „Success factors at work“. Der Vortrag ist dabei in folgende Kapitel unterteilt:

  • What are negotiations
  • Assertiveness is key
  • Our rights
  • What's a good result?
  • BATNA to decide
  • Principle based negotiation
  • 1 - Separate people from the problem
  • 2 - Focus on interests, not positions
  • 3 - Invent opportunities for mutual gain
  • 4 - Insist on using objective criteria
  • Recognizing cheap tricks

Quiz zum Vortrag

  1. In a negotiation the discussion is quite complex and several dimensions are addressed. You go deeper into the topic than in a bargain. A bargain only addresses one dimension of a topic and no real arguments to sustain a position are brought forward.
  2. In a bargain the discussion is quite complex and several dimensions are addressed. You go deeper into the topic than in a negotiation. A negotiation only addresses one dimension of a topic and no real arguments to sustain a position are brought forward.
  3. In a bargain the discussion is quite complex. You go deeper into the topic than in a negotiation. A negotiation only addresses one dimension of a topic and no real arguments to sustain a position are brought forward.
  4. In a negotiation the discussion is quite complex. You go deeper into the topic than in a bargain. A bargain only addresses one dimension of a topic but real arguments to sustain a position are brought forward.
  1. I have the right to say "I don't care", "It's not my problem" and "Your opinion is not relevant to my decision" and still feel good about it.
  2. Amongst others, I have the right to feel superior to everyone else, because not everybody has the same rights as I do.
  3. I have the right to say "I'm sorry" or "Please accept my excuse". If I mess up, I have to use these phrases.
  4. I have the right to say "Go away", "Damn" and "I’m doing it my way" and still feel good about it.
  1. They are fast, easy and powerful.
  2. They are durable, fair and efficient.
  3. They do not damage the relationship, provide reasons, results and respect.
  4. They require me to insist on my position.
  1. describes the best alternative to a negotiated agreement - what is our best alternative if this negotiation fails?
  2. describes the best annual trading negotiation agreement - the abbreviation for great results.
  3. is similar to our NAFTA.
  4. becomes very clear once the negotiation is over and we have negotiated a perfect result.
  1. There are four principles: separating the people from the problem, focusing on interests and not positions, inventing opportunities for mutual gain, insisting on using objective criteria.
  2. The three principles are: separating the people from the problem, focusing on interests and not positions, insisting on using objective criteria.
  3. There are five principles: separating the people from the problem, focusing on interests and not positions, inventing opportunities for mutual gain, creating a pleasant atmosphere, insisting on using objective criteria.
  4. There are four principles: separating the people from the problem, focusing on interests and not positions, creating a pleasant atmosphere, insisting on using objective criteria.
  1. You should give nothing in response and simply smile.
  2. “Yes, this is something you should take care of.”
  3. “I’ll do that.”
  4. You should apologize for the extra amount of work which is created.
  5. You should look at the other people for help.
  1. “Yes, of course, I understand. Talk to your boss first before you make a decision.”
  2. “I thought we were negotiating about this but I have the feeling that maybe you do not have the authority to get the right deal out of this for the tow of us. Therefore, I would like to call your boss directly and negotiate with him.”
  3. “I thought we were negotiating about this but I have the feeling that maybe you do not have the authority to get the right deal out of this for both of us. Therefore, I would like you to make an appointment with me and your boss in the next few weeks.”
  4. “Yes, I understand that you would prefer to talk to your boss first in order to make a decision but can’t you make an exception just this once? I am sure your boss will understand.”

Dozent des Vortrages Business negotiation (part 1): strategies

 Michael Schmitz

Michael Schmitz

Michael Schmitz ist der Gründer von Artefact Consulting und führt Trainings für Universitäten und Firmen weltweit durch. Neben seiner Tätigkeit als Trainer und Dozent ist er Buchautor von "Elitestudent - Wie werde ich besser als der Durchschnitt" und Geschäftsführer eines Netzwerks für Elitestudenten (Elitestudent-Deutschland.de). Vor seiner Selbstständigkeit hat er für die Deutsche Bank in Frankfurt und London gearbeitet und war mit globalen Managementaufgaben und Bankenintegrationsprojekten beschäftigt. Michael Schmitz schloss seine Studien an der Rotterdam School of Management und der Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration in Bergen mit einem Master of Science in International Management und einem weiteren Master, dem CEMS Master in International Management, ab. Er hat einen Bachelor of Science in International Business von der Universität Maastricht und der BI Norwegian School of Management in Oslo.

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Auszüge aus dem Begleitmaterial

... 5. Principle based negotiations (Harvard Approach) 1. Separate people from the problem 2. Focus on interest, not positions 3. Invent ...

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