Exam Questions & Training – Part A von Helen Morris

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Über den Vortrag

Der Vortrag „Exam Questions & Training – Part A“ von Helen Morris ist Bestandteil des Kurses „ITIL® Foundation (2011) (EN)“.


Quiz zum Vortrag

  1. Changes to business strategy.
  2. Changes to a mainframe computer.
  3. Changes to a service level agreement (SLA).
  4. The retirement of a service.
  1. To undertake testing to ensure services are designed to meet business needs.
  2. To deliver and manage IT services.
  3. To manage the technology used to deliver services.
  4. To monitor the performance of technology and processes.
  1. Overseeing the execution and monitoring of operational activities and events.
  2. Managing the technical and applications management functions.
  3. A set of tools used to monitor and display the status of the IT infrastructure and applications.
  4. A service desk monitoring the status of the infrastructure when operators are not available.
  1. Service asset and configuration management (SACM)
  2. Service level management
  3. Service portfolio management
  4. Incident management
  1. Documenting the roles and responsibilities of stakeholders in a process or activity.
  2. Defining requirements for a new service or process.
  3. Analysing the business impact of an incident.
  4. Creating a balanced scorecard showing the overall status of service management.
  1. An agreement between an IT service provider and another part of the same organization that assists in the provision of services.
  2. A written agreement between the IT service provider and their customer(s) defining key targets and responsibilities of both parties.
  3. An agreement between two service providers about the levels of service required by the customer.
  4. An agreement between a third party service desk and the IT customer about fix and response times.
  1. To ensure that service availability meets the agreed needs of the business.
  2. To monitor and report availability of components.
  3. To ensure that all targets in the service level agreements (SLAs) are met.
  4. To guarantee availability levels for services and components.
  1. All of the above
  2. 1 and 2 only
  3. 2 only
  4. 1 and 3 only
  1. Service optimization
  2. Service transition
  3. Service design
  4. Service strategy
  1. If an organization outsources its IT services there is still a need for a CMS.
  2. The CMS should not contain corporate data about customers and users.
  3. There may be more than one CMS.
  4. There should not be more than one configuration management database (CMDB).
  1. Business capacity management, service capacity management and component capacity management
  2. Supplier capacity management, service capacity management and component capacity management
  3. Supplier capacity management, service capacity management and technology capacity management
  4. Business capacity management, technology capacity management and component capacity management
  1. 1, 2 and 3 only
  2. All of the above
  3. 1 and 2 only
  4. 3 and 4 only
  1. Service level management
  2. Supplier management
  3. Service portfolio management
  4. Demand management
  1. The process owner
  2. The service owner
  3. The chief information officer
  4. Knowledge management
  1. 1 and 2 only
  2. All of the above
  3. 2 and 3 only
  4. 1 and 3 only
  1. All of the above
  2. 1 and 3 only
  3. 1 and 2 only
  4. 2 and 3 only
  1. 1, 2 and 3 only
  2. 3 only
  3. All of the above
  4. 2, 3 and 4 only
  1. All customers, users and IT staff.
  2. Senior business managers and IT staff.
  3. Senior business managers, IT executives and the information security manager.
  4. Information security management staff only.
  1. All of the above
  2. 1, 2 and 4 only
  3. 2 and 3 only
  4. 1 only
  1. All of the above
  2. 1, 3 and 4 only
  3. 1, 2 and 3 only
  4. 2, 3 and 4 only
  1. Both of the above
  2. 1 only
  3. 2 only
  4. Neither of the above
  1. Dealing with service requests from the users.
  2. Making sure all requests within an IT organization are fulfilled
  3. Ensuring fulfilment of change requests.
  4. Making sure the service level agreement (SLA) is met.
  1. The customer's perception of the service is an important factor in value creation.
  2. The value of a service can only ever be measured in financial terms.
  3. Delivering service provider outcomes is important in the value of a service.
  4. Service provider preferences drive the value perception of a service.
  1. Internal and external customers should receive the level of customer service that has been agreed.
  2. External customers should receive better customer service because they pay for their IT services.
  3. Internal customers should receive better customer service because they pay employee salaries.
  4. The best customer service should be given to the customer that pays the most money.
  1. Value
  2. Capabilities
  3. Cost
  4. Risk
  1. Monitoring service performance against service level agreements (SLAs).
  2. Designing the configuration management system from a business perspective.
  3. Creating technology metrics to align with customer needs.
  4. Training service desk staff how to deal with customer complaints about service.
  1. The ability to detect events, make sense of them and determine the appropriate control action.
  2. The ability to detect events, restore normal service as soon as possible and minimize the adverse impact on business operations.
  3. The ability to monitor and control the activities of technical staff.
  4. The ability to report on the successful delivery of services by checking the uptime of infrastructure devices.
  1. Details of all operational services
  2. The version information of all software
  3. The organizational structure of the company
  4. Asset information
  1. Customers are assured of certain levels of availability, capacity, continuity and security.
  2. The service is fit for purpose.
  3. There will be no failures in applications and infrastructure associated with the service.
  4. All service-related problems are fixed free of charge for a certain period of time.
  1. Understand the business vision and objectives.
  2. Carry out a baseline assessment to understand the current situation.
  3. Agree on priorities for improvement.
  4. Create and verify a plan.
  1. It provides pre-defined steps for handling particular types of incidents.
  2. It will make problems easier to identify and diagnose.
  3. It means known incident types never recur.
  4. It ensures all incidents are easy to solve.
  1. Identification, logging, categorization, prioritization, initial diagnosis, escalation, investigation and diagnosis, resolution and recovery, closure
  2. Prioritization, identification, logging, categorization, initial diagnosis, escalation, investigation and diagnosis, resolution and recovery, closure
  3. Identification, logging, initial diagnosis, categorization, prioritization, escalation, resolution and recovery, investigation and diagnosis, closure
  4. Identification, initial diagnosis, investigation, logging, categorization, escalation, prioritization, resolution and recovery, closure
  1. Service design
  2. Service operation
  3. Service strategy
  4. Service delivery
  1. 1 and 2 only
  2. All of the above
  3. 1 and 3 only
  4. 2 and 3 only
  1. Personnel metrics
  2. Process metrics
  3. Service metrics
  4. Technology metrics
  1. The CMS is part of the SKMS.
  2. The SKMS is part of the CMS.
  3. The CMS and SKMS are the same thing.
  4. There is no relationship between the CMS and the SKMS.
  1. To assist the change manager in evaluating emergency changes and to decide whether they should be authorized.
  2. To assist the change manager in ensuring that no urgent changes are made during particularly volatile business periods.
  3. To assist the change manager by implementing emergency changes.
  4. To assist the change manager in speeding up the emergency change process so that no unacceptable delays occur.
  1. 1 only
  2. 2 only
  3. Both of the above
  4. Neither of the above
  1. People, partners, products, processes
  2. Planning, products, position, processes
  3. Planning, perspective, position, people
  4. Perspective, partners, problems, people
  1. The problem record remains open and details of the workaround are documented within it.
  2. The problem record is closed.
  3. The problem record remains open and details of the workaround are documented on all related incident records.
  4. The problem record is closed and details of the workaround are documented in a request for change (RFC).

Dozent des Vortrages Exam Questions & Training – Part A

 Helen Morris

Helen Morris

Helen Morris, the owner of Henry Gale Associates Ltd. and co-director of Helix Service Management Service Ltd., is an experienced consultant and trainer, with over 20 years of experience in service management, including operational management of service desks, technical support teams, and service level management. She provides quality training and consultancy worldwide, which has helped a number of organizations in both the public and the private sector to achieve best practice implementations. Helen Morris also leads programs to achieve significant improvements in customer satisfaction and service quality. Many of her assignments involve an initial assessment against best practice, recommendations for improvement, and target setting.

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