Preparation for Media Encounter von Tom Maddocks

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Über den Vortrag

Der Vortrag „Preparation for Media Encounter“ von Tom Maddocks ist Bestandteil des Kurses „Online Media Training“. Der Vortrag ist dabei in folgende Kapitel unterteilt:

  • Introduction
  • Reactive media handling
  • 3 stage preparation process
  • Answering difficult questions
  • More bridging phrases
  • E - Examples
  • QU - Quotes
  • A - Anecdotes
  • L - Likenesses
  • S - Statistics and Numbers

Quiz zum Vortrag

  1. No
  2. Yes No
  3. If a reporter calls up needing an immediate comment, there is no time to prepare
  1. Buy yourself some thinking time – even if it’s only 10 minutes. Find out what they want, then arrange to talk to them at a fixed time once you’ve had a chance to think about what you want to say
  2. Talk to them –they’re busy people after all Tell them you’re too busy today but they should ring back next week Buy yourself some thinking time – even if it’s only 10 minutes. Find out what they want, then arrange to talk to them at a fixed time once you’ve had a chance to think about what you want to say
  3. Tell them you’re too busy today but they should ring back next week
  1. Establish the 'angle' of the item when the reporter first calls, and make it clear that you would be putting forward an opposing point of view, then be willing to 'leave it' if that is not what the journalist is looking for
  2. Politely turn down the opportunity to be interviewed. You could be 'used' in the article or programme to push forward a point of view you actually disagree with
  3. Never turn down the opportunity – use your best arguments to turn the journalist round to your point of view, and get your key messages across
  1. All equally important
  2. Establishing the reporter's agenda
  3. Establishing your own agenda
  4. Preparing for awkward questions
  1. Say as little as possible on a topic you'd rather avoid, then move on to something else
  2. Avoid answering a negative question
  3. Confuse the reporter so he or she forgets what the question was
  1. Professional
  2. Frosty if they ask you personal questions
  3. Brief – you're both busy and need to get on with it
  1. Examples and Statistics
  2. Examples and Soundbites
  3. Evidence and Statements
  1. The power of three
  2. Rhyming couplets
  3. Slang or street language
  1. So that you can work out how you would answer the question if it does come up
  2. So that you can almost guarantee it won’t come up
  3. So that you can get yourself even more worried about the interview than you were already
  1. No – because not everyone will understand what you are talking about and they will feel alienated or excluded
  2. Yes – because it will make you sound like you are knowledgeable or ‘on the inside track’
  3. Yes - because it’s shorter and snappier, and saves time during the interview for you to make other valuable points

Dozent des Vortrages Preparation for Media Encounter

 Tom Maddocks

Tom Maddocks

Tom is a former BBC television and radio journalist who is now acknowledged as one of the UK's leading authorities on media coaching and training. He has been quoted on the subject in many national newspapers and trade publications. Tom has over twenty years’ experience as a journalist and broadcaster, working in TV, radio and the national press, and for five years was a reporter on 'The Money Programme' broadcast on BBC Television and around the globe on BBC World News. Over the past decade, Tom has helped improve the media and presentation skills of individuals up to CEO/board level at many leading companies in the UK and elsewhere in Europe through his company Media Training Associates, preparing them for dealing with the international media. Tom is the author of the book 'The M-factor: media confidence for business leaders and managers' (www.m-factorbook.co.uk) which was published in 2013.

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